Sweet Curry Roasted Root Vegetable Salad with Lime Garlic Tahini Dressing

Curry Roasted Carrot & Rutabaga Salad with Grilled Chicken & Garlic Lime Tahini Dressing
I had a hard time coming up with a succinct title for this salad–there’s just SO MUCH going on! Curry roasted carrots and rutabaga with currants add a sweet, cinnamon kick, while the garlic lime tahini dressing coats the greens in bright and earthy goodness. And the grilled chicken. It’s a DASH diet dinner winner.

Oh boy, this leftover salad was delicious! With so many flavors going on, it’s a feast of a salad. Let’s see: A savory sautéed chicken breast. A sweet and aromatic roasted rutabaga and carrots with currants, maple syrup and ras el hanout (a mild, fragrant North African curry powder). A reliable bed of lettuce, baby kale, grape tomatoes and scallion. Then everything gets a coat of bright, earthy, garlicky lime garlic tahini dressing. The combination was 100% spot-on and satisfying.

I made the salad using the curry-spiced rutabaga and carrots that I already had roasted, but you can of course start from roasting the root vegetables. Recipe for roasting is right here. You can save time by using pre-sauteed (or even better, pre-grilled) chicken breast as well. Then it’ll be a matter of assembling everything–perfect for a weeknight DASH diet dinner.

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Sweet Curry Roasted Root Vegetable Salad with Lime Garlic Tahini Dressing
DASH diet considerations: This curry roasted root vegetable salad with lime garlic tahini dressing is an all-A student of the DASH diet realm. It packs about 4 servings of different vegetables (full of fiber and potassium); tahini helps it go light on oil while providing an incredibly earthy depth to the dressing; and simply cooked chicken breast provides lean protein.

The wide range of flavors, from bright, earthy tahini dressing to sweetly aromatic curry roasted vegetables, as well as the different textures really jazzes up the salad without a lot of sodium or oil. Give it a try! We skipped grains, but a pita would go perfectly with this Middle Eastern-inspired salad.

DASH diet servings:
4 vegetables & fruits
2 meats & fish
½ fat & oil
¼ nuts & beans
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
For the chicken breast
For the lime garlic tahini dressing
For the salad
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
For the chicken breast
For the lime garlic tahini dressing
For the salad
Instructions
  1. Season the chicken breast with salt and pepper.
  2. In a saute pan, heat 2 tsp olive oil on medium high and add the chicken breast. Saute until the chicken is cooked through, about 7-8 minutes, flipping once to brown both sides. Set aside in a wam place.
  3. While the chicken breast cooks, make the dressing. Mix the tahini, extra virgin olive oil, lime juice and grated garlic in a bowl large enough to toss the lettuce and kale comfortably. Add water, 1 tsp at a time, to thin the dressing to a pourable consistency. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. To the bowl of the dressing, add the lettuce, baby kale, grape tomatoes and scallion. Toss to coat evenly.
  5. Slice the chicken breast into strips.
  6. Place the lettuce-kale mixture in two plates or bowls. Top with the roasted rutabaga and carrots, as well as the chicken breast strips.
  7. Sprinkle some za’atar on top, if you like, before serving.

curry roasted root vegetable salad with lime garlic tahini dressing

Bright, Herby Frankfurter Green Sauce

DASH Recipe: Chicken Schnitzel with Frankfurter Green Sauce

DASH Recipe: Chicken Schnitzel with Frankfurter Green SauceIn Frankfurt, green sauce (grune sosse or grüne soße in German) is ubiquitous. The somewhat tartar-like sauce with a ton of herbs magically manages to be refreshing and hearty at the same time. Simple boiled vegetables like potatoes and broccoli get a serious upgrade with a dollop or two of this stuff–add a slice or two of ham, and you have a complete, satisfying meal. In this adapted version, I use common ingredients (think Greek yogurt instead of quark) and fewer herbs (bye bye, borage and burnet), but the bright, herby and hearty sauce comes out pretty close to the real deal.

A few years ago, we spent a couple of nights in Frankfurt on the way to and from a year-end vacation in Paris. One night, we went to an apfelwein inn where we sat on a communal bench, elbow-to-elbow with locals and tourists alike, drinking from a beautiful ceramic jug of the German hard cider. It was a cold winter night but inside the warm, steamy inn, the atmosphere was jovial and convivial, just as I’d imagine an old roadside inn serving locals and travelers hundreds of years ago.

I had a giant plate of schnitzel with boiled potatoes, topped with a local green sauce. A delightfully bright, herby and creamy sauce made with (I guessed) sour cream and a ton of herbs, the sauce was a perfect accompaniment to the earthy potatoes and hearty schnitzel. Apfelwein kept flowing, our tummies got full, and we trekked back to our hotel happy and satiated.

When Hubby picked up a can of genuine apfelwein from a beer store nearby, all this fond memory came back, and I had to make some schnitzel with this green sauce to go with the cider. I got a-Googling. As it turned out, the Frankfurt-style green sauce contains a hard boiled egg, which gives the sauce a subtle savory body and extra richness, similar to how boiled eggs work in tartar sauce.

I also found out that the green sauce calls for quite a few types of herbs, some of which I hadn’t even heard of. Since I didn’t want to end up with a fridge full of wilting herbs, I decided to get just a couple: Watercress, which is easy to consume in a salad; parsley, which can go into a stock or chimichurri sauce; and chives, which is totally versatile. Despite the omissions, the sauce came out pretty close to what I remembered. I love this sauce!

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Bright, Herby Frankfurter Green Sauce
DASH considerations: The Frankfurter green sauce might not be particularly great when seen from the DASH perspective. It does somewhat depend on what you compare it to, though: As a substitute for straight sour cream, for instance, this is a much lighter version with less fat and sneaky addition of greens. However, you wouldn't be eating a cup of this stuff, so it's kind of, sort of, negligible in the grand scheme of things...

DASH servings (for 2 tablespoon of the green sauce):
I would just count it as 1/2 serving of fat and maaaaaybe 1/4 serving of vegetables. The rest ends up being pretty miniscule.
DASH Recipe: Chicken Schnitzel with Frankfurter Green Sauce
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
DASH Recipe: Chicken Schnitzel with Frankfurter Green Sauce
Instructions
  1. Boil, cool and peel the egg. Chop the egg roughly.
  2. In a tall-sided bowl (I used the plastic container that came with my immersion blender), combine the egg, sour cream, Greek yogurt, watercress, parsley, chives and lemon juice. Using an immersion blender, blend until the ingredients form a more or less uniform, smooth mixture. (Add the extra virgin olive oil along with all the other ingredients, if using.)
  3. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

There are so many possibilities with this sauce:

  • The first night, I served it traditional, with boiled potatoes, broccoli and a chicken schnitzel (that uses mustard instead of an egg as the coating agent, a neat trick I learned from Blue Apron).
  • It’s fantastic as a sandwich spread. I made a ham sandwich with cucumber and lettuce on bread smeared with this sauce for a hiking lunch, and it was glorious.
  • It would be lovely on top of potato pancakes, in place of sour cream.
  • We made a tasty New Year’s Eve appetizer of smoked salmon and cucumber on crackers with a dollop of the green sauce. Nom nom!

Any other ideas?

Roasted Pumpkin & Chorizo Black Bean Quinoa Bowl

DASH Recipe: Black Bean Quinoa Bowl with Roasted Pumpkin

There’s a lot of flavors going on in the roasted pumpkin and chorizo black bean quinoa bowl: Hearty black beans, caramelized sweetness of the roasted pumpkin, a bit of heat and Tex Mex zing from jalapeño and chili powder, the bright acidity from tomatoes and lime juice that lightens up the whole thing. On top of all that, just a small amount of Mexican smoked chorizo lends an amazing depth and savoriness to this almost-all-veggie bowl. It’s a complete meal in one bowl, but thanks to all these flavors and a variety of textures, you won’t get bored till the very last bite!

In our home, the recipe below yielded 2 dinner servings, plus about ⅓ cup of black bean-quinoa mixture left over. I’m thinking that it’d be awesome in a quesadilla format… I can even toss in the remaining roasted pumpkin I still have in the fridge. (It was a big pumpkin.)

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Roasted Pumpkin & Chorizo Black Bean Quinoa Bowl
DASH benefits: This pumpkin and black bean quinoa bowl has a lot going for it from the DASH perspective: A ton of vegetables, sweetness without the added sugar (roasted pumpkin, I love you!), amazing meaty flavor from a tiny bit of chorizo. Aromatic chili powder and tart lime juice also reduce the need for extra sodium to create a satisfying flavor profile. This quick and economical bowl is also packed with a good amount of lean protein: Both black beans and quinoa are high on the list of great plant sources of protein.

DASH servings:
1 grains
3 vegetables & fruits
0.75 meats & fish
1 fat & oil
1 nuts & beans
DASH Recipe: Black Bean Quinoa Bowl with Roasted Pumpkin
Prep Time 30 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Prep Time 30 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
DASH Recipe: Black Bean Quinoa Bowl with Roasted Pumpkin
Instructions
  1. Place the quinoa with 2 cups of water in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil on high. When it reaches a boil, turn the heat down to low and simmer for 13-14 minutes or until all the water is absorbed.
  2. While the quinoa cooks, heat the olive oil in a skillet. Add the onion, jalapeño and chorizo. Sauté on medium heat until the onion is slightly browned.
  3. Drain the can of black beans and add 1 cup of the beans to the skillet. Sauté for a few minutes, stirring frequently to prevent burning, until the liquid is mostly gone. Season with chili powder. Taste, and add salt and pepper of needed.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the pumpkin, tomato, scallion and cilantro. Drizzle with the juice of one lime half and extra virgin olive oil. Season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine.
  5. To the skillet of black beans, add the cooked quinoa and stir to combine. Taste, and add salt and pepper of needed.
  6. Line two salad bowls with torn lettuce leaves. Add the black bean-quinoa mixture. Top with the pumpkin-tomato mixture. Cut the remaining lime half into two and place on the side of the bowls.
Recipe Notes

*Any pumpkin or winter squash would work here. Sweet potato and yam would be lovely as well.

DASH Menu: Jamaican Curry Soup with Cod and Cauliflower

Jamaican Curry Soup with Cod IngredientsSoups and chowders often taste better after sitting in the fridge for a day or two, but sometimes I don’t want to eat the same thing twice within a span of a few days. Adding curry powder to creamy chowders is a trick I use often to liven up a leftover in those cases. Here, I added a generous amount of Jamaican curry powder to the milk-based cod and cauliflower chowder from a few days ago, and served it as a soupy curry with basmati rice. It was warm, aromatic, savory and filling; just what I needed on a cold winter night after a day of work!

I also made a quick vinegar-based coleslaw and sliced up some tomatoes (not in the recipe below) to up the vegetable intake. The cool, crunchy vegetables were definitely a nice contrast to the warm, tender veggies in the curry soup.

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DASH Menu: Jamaican Curry Soup with Cod and Cauliflower
DASH benefit: The same benefits as those for the original cauliflower cod chowder applies here: The curry gives you loads of vegetables and lean protein in an aromatic Jamaican curry sauce without the fat of heavy cream. Many recipes for basmati rice call for salt, but it really isn't necessary here, either, as it soaks up the tasty curry sauce in the bowl.

DASH servings:
2 grains
4 vegetables & fruits
0.25 dairy
2 meats & fish
0.75 fat & oil
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
For the curry soup and rice
For the coleslow
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
For the curry soup and rice
For the coleslow
Instructions
  1. Rinse the basmati rice in a few changes of water. Add the rice and water in a small saucepan. Cover the pan and bring to a boil on high. Once boiling, turn the heat down to low and let it bubble and simmer until all the liquid is gone, about 10-12 minutes.
  2. While the rice cooks, toss the shredded cabbage with a pinch of salt. Let it marinate for a few minutes.
  3. Squeeze out the moisture from the cabbage. Add the scallion, cilantro, olive oil, vinegar and freshly ground black pepper to the cabbage. Toss to combine.
  4. Reheat the cauliflower cod chowder on medium low. Once heated through, add the Jamaican curry powder. Stir to combine thoroughly. Taste, and add more curry powder if needed.
  5. Fluff the rice. Divide between two bowls and top with the curry.

*My favorite brand of Jamaican curry powder is Blue Mountain, which seems to be available at some chain grocery stores and Caribbean markets around here. I use the mild version in a yellow jar, not the hot one in a red jar. Other types of curry powder might also work (Japanese, Vietnamese, Indian, etc.), but I think the garlic-thyme combo in the original cod chowder works best with the Jamaican flavors.

Toasted Buckwheat Bowl with Wilted Kale, Roasted Sweet Potato, Currants and Pecans

Buckwheat Bowl with Roasted Sweet Potato & Kale IngredientsLike every other hipster foodie (riiiight), I’ve come to love the grain bowl format. It’s pretty fast to put together (even faster if I have the cooked grain waiting in the fridge), accommodates basically whatever vegetables I have on hand, and takes on the personality of the dressing to morph into any pseudo-ethnic meal I’m in the mood for. I’ve made grain bowls with a lot of different grains: Quinoa, farro, wild rice, even Israeli couscous, which is really a pasta rather than a grain. This week, I had a half-used bag of buckwheat groats in the pantry, and decided to try using buckwheat in this format.

Buckwheat Bowl with Roasted Sweet Potato & KaleThe last time I used buckwheat groats, I simply boiled them and dressed them in a mushroom cream sauce that was kind of sort of Russian in my imagination. It was okay, but a tad too heavy and too one-note to my liking. The groats came out starchy-sticky, too, which I thought might be a problem in the grain bowl format. To avoid the one-note boredom and excessive starchiness, I toasted the buckwheat before boiling the groats, and rinsed them thoroughly under cold water after boiling in order to wash off the starch that leaked out during the cooking process. This seemed to work well.

I topped the buckwheat bowl with half a salmon burger (frozen from Costco) each, but you can keep it vegetarian, or top it with a boiled egg or grilled chicken for an additional protein kick.

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Toasted Buckwheat Bowl with Wilted Kale, Roasted Sweet Potato, Currants and Pecans
DASH benefits: The buckwheat bowl provides 1 serving of whole grain and 2-3 servings of vegetables and fruits without a lot of added sugar or oil. Dried currants do double duty here: They provide the sweetness without being sugary, and they count as fruits. Win!

DASH servings:
1 grain
2.25 vegetables & fruits
1.5 fat & oil
0.5 nuts & beans
0.25 sweets
Prep Time 30 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Prep Time 30 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Heat a heavy-bottomed skillet and toast the buckwheat groats over medium heat, stirring occasionally to prevent scorching, until the groats take on some golden brown color.
  2. Add the buckwheat groats and water to a pot and boil for 12 minutes (or follow the direction on the bag).
  3. While the buckwheat cooks, add the dried currants to apple cider vinegar to rehydrate.
  4. Blanch the kale in a separate pot of boiling water for 1-2 minutes, just enough to wilt the tough leaves. Drain thoroughly.
  5. Heat the olive oil in a pan and saute the shiitake mushrooms. Season with salt and pepper.
  6. Rinse the buckwheat groats quickly under cold running water when done cooking, and drain thoroughly.
  7. In a large bowl, mix the buckwheat, kale, roasted sweet potato, shiitake, pecans and currants along with the apple cider vinegar and maple syrup. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper to taste.
Recipe Notes

*I happened to have some roasted sweet potato chunks I needed to use up. If you are roasting the sweet potato from scratch, cooking time will be longer.

DASH Menu: Skirt Steak Wrap with Cumin Hummus & Roasted Carrot Salad with Lemon Tahini Dressing

For a quick weeknight dinner, I coupled a skirt steak wrap with a hearty and nutrient-packed roasted carrot and arugula salad, and made an earthy yet refreshingly bright lemon tahini dressing to complete the vaguely Middle Eastern feel of the menu. The hummus works so well as a sandwich or wrap spread–this wrap is otherwise pretty bland, but the cumin kick and creamy body of the hummus really make it into a satisfying meal.

Two regrets: I would have added toasted cumin to the lemon tahini dressing, if cumin wasn’t in the hummus-skirt steak wrap. Sprinkling the skirt steak with za’atar or sumac might have made the wrap even more interesting, with their floral zing. Next time!

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Skirt Steak Wrap with Cumin Hummus & Roasted Carrot Salad with Lemon Tahini Dressing
DASH considerations: This skirt steak wrap and roasted carrot salad combo violates a few DASH meal guidelines. First, I used skirt steak, because that’s what I had on hand, but it’s not one of the leaner meat options. You could easily substitute it with grilled chicken breast to make the protein part leaner. Second, it has a higher fat/oil content than many DASH recipes on this site, about half the daily limit for that category. You can probably skip the extra virgin olive oil in the lemon tahini dressing and rely entirely on the sesame oil contained in the tahini paste. This would cut down the fat & oil amount a bit (by about 0.25 serving). Or, you could opt for lower-fat meals for the other meals of the day.

DASH servings:
2 grains
1.75 vegetables & fruits
1 meats & fish
1.5 fat & oil
0.25 beans & nuts
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
For skirt steak wrap with cumin hummus
For roasted carrot salad with lemon tahini dressing
Prep Time 20 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
For skirt steak wrap with cumin hummus
For roasted carrot salad with lemon tahini dressing
Instructions
  1. In a small skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the pepper strips.
  2. When the pepper pieces start to brown, place the skirt steak pieces on top to reheat.
  3. While the pepper and beef cook, make the dressing by mixing the lemon juice, tahini, EVOO, scallions and red chili flakes in a bowl large enough to toss the salad in.
  4. Add the roasted carrots and arugula to the bowl and toss it well so the dressing evenly coats the vegetables. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. When the peppers are cooked through, turn the heat off.
  6. If using pita, separate the two sides to make a pocket. Spread the hummus, stuff the pepper and steak, and top with cilantro.
  7. If using tortilla, spread the hummus and place the pepper and steak all the way down the middle. Top with cilantro and roll up the whole tortilla.

Homemade Hummus with Cumin

DASH Recipe: Cumin Hummus with Veggies

Oh my god, I had no idea homemade hummus was SO GOOD. I should have known this. Evidence abounds:

  1. The hummus we get at restaurants are probably homemade, and they are leaps and bounds better than the store-bought ones.
  2. My sister in law has been making her own hummus. She’s a cash-strapped grad student, so that must play a big role here, but she keeps making it. It’s got to be good.
  3. Everyone who blogs about cooking seems to be singing the glory of homemade hummus and endless varieties thereof.

Cumin Hummus Ingredients

I’ve been curious about making hummus for a long time. The final straw was the amazing specimen we had at Bar Virage in Lower East Side a few months ago: It was the best hummus I’ve ever had, and I wanted it to appear way more often in my life than it conceivably would, given that the “Israeli gastropub” is outside of our normal stomping ground. Anyway, the stars were aligned one day (read: I had all the ingredients on hand), and I made hummus. And holy cow, it was amazing.

Print Recipe
Homemade Hummus with Cumin
DASH benefits: Relatively low in fat, hummus is a good alternative to sugary snacks and a great source of non-meat protein. However, hummus can be high in sodium, especially if made with canned chickpeas (which is what I did). So, a few tricks on that front: 1) Use a low sodium version of canned chickpeas. 2) Eat the hummus with fresh veggies rather than pita chips that also contain salt.

DASH servings: ⅔ nuts & beans
1 fat & oil
DASH Recipe: Cumin Hummus with Veggies
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Prep Time 10 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
DASH Recipe: Cumin Hummus with Veggies
Instructions
  1. In a small, dry skillet, toast the cumin and red chili flakes over medium heat, until fragrant. This shouldn't take more than a few minutes. Be careful not to burn the spices.
  2. Grind the cumin and red chili flakes. You can use a mortar and pestle like I did, or use n electric spice grinder.
  3. Put all the ingredients in a deep container and use an immersion blender to combine. Pulse until smooth.

Using Up Homemade Hummus

The first day, we just scooped it up with fresh veggies and made it a refreshing yet satisfying dinner. We had tomato, celery, cucumber and red pepper, and decided that celery and red pepper were the winners. The other two didn’t have enough of a crunch and a little too high in water content.

Hummus stays fresh in the fridge for 5 days or so. And it’s really not hard to use it all up because it’s so versatile, but it freezes and thaws well if necessary. I had a little bit added to my lunch salads a couple of times throughout the week, and used up the rest as a spread in a skirt steak wrap with grilled green pepper and cilantro. It’s amazing how much it adds to an otherwise nondescript wrap or a sandwich!