Bright, Herby Frankfurter Green Sauce

DASH Recipe: Chicken Schnitzel with Frankfurter Green Sauce

DASH Recipe: Chicken Schnitzel with Frankfurter Green SauceIn Frankfurt, green sauce (grune sosse or grüne soße in German) is ubiquitous. The somewhat tartar-like sauce with a ton of herbs magically manages to be refreshing and hearty at the same time. Simple boiled vegetables like potatoes and broccoli get a serious upgrade with a dollop or two of this stuff–add a slice or two of ham, and you have a complete, satisfying meal. In this adapted version, I use common ingredients (think Greek yogurt instead of quark) and fewer herbs (bye bye, borage and burnet), but the bright, herby and hearty sauce comes out pretty close to the real deal.

A few years ago, we spent a couple of nights in Frankfurt on the way to and from a year-end vacation in Paris. One night, we went to an apfelwein inn where we sat on a communal bench, elbow-to-elbow with locals and tourists alike, drinking from a beautiful ceramic jug of the German hard cider. It was a cold winter night but inside the warm, steamy inn, the atmosphere was jovial and convivial, just as I’d imagine an old roadside inn serving locals and travelers hundreds of years ago.

I had a giant plate of schnitzel with boiled potatoes, topped with a local green sauce. A delightfully bright, herby and creamy sauce made with (I guessed) sour cream and a ton of herbs, the sauce was a perfect accompaniment to the earthy potatoes and hearty schnitzel. Apfelwein kept flowing, our tummies got full, and we trekked back to our hotel happy and satiated.

When Hubby picked up a can of genuine apfelwein from a beer store nearby, all this fond memory came back, and I had to make some schnitzel with this green sauce to go with the cider. I got a-Googling. As it turned out, the Frankfurt-style green sauce contains a hard boiled egg, which gives the sauce a subtle savory body and extra richness, similar to how boiled eggs work in tartar sauce.

I also found out that the green sauce calls for quite a few types of herbs, some of which I hadn’t even heard of. Since I didn’t want to end up with a fridge full of wilting herbs, I decided to get just a couple: Watercress, which is easy to consume in a salad; parsley, which can go into a stock or chimichurri sauce; and chives, which is totally versatile. Despite the omissions, the sauce came out pretty close to what I remembered. I love this sauce!

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Bright, Herby Frankfurter Green Sauce
DASH considerations: The Frankfurter green sauce might not be particularly great when seen from the DASH perspective. It does somewhat depend on what you compare it to, though: As a substitute for straight sour cream, for instance, this is a much lighter version with less fat and sneaky addition of greens. However, you wouldn't be eating a cup of this stuff, so it's kind of, sort of, negligible in the grand scheme of things...

DASH servings (for 2 tablespoon of the green sauce):
I would just count it as 1/2 serving of fat and maaaaaybe 1/4 serving of vegetables. The rest ends up being pretty miniscule.
DASH Recipe: Chicken Schnitzel with Frankfurter Green Sauce
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Prep Time 15 minutes
Servings
cups
Ingredients
DASH Recipe: Chicken Schnitzel with Frankfurter Green Sauce
Instructions
  1. Boil, cool and peel the egg. Chop the egg roughly.
  2. In a tall-sided bowl (I used the plastic container that came with my immersion blender), combine the egg, sour cream, Greek yogurt, watercress, parsley, chives and lemon juice. Using an immersion blender, blend until the ingredients form a more or less uniform, smooth mixture. (Add the extra virgin olive oil along with all the other ingredients, if using.)
  3. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

There are so many possibilities with this sauce:

  • The first night, I served it traditional, with boiled potatoes, broccoli and a chicken schnitzel (that uses mustard instead of an egg as the coating agent, a neat trick I learned from Blue Apron).
  • It’s fantastic as a sandwich spread. I made a ham sandwich with cucumber and lettuce on bread smeared with this sauce for a hiking lunch, and it was glorious.
  • It would be lovely on top of potato pancakes, in place of sour cream.
  • We made a tasty New Year’s Eve appetizer of smoked salmon and cucumber on crackers with a dollop of the green sauce. Nom nom!

Any other ideas?

Curry Soba with Burdock and Chicken

DASH Recipe: Curry Soba with Burdock & ChickenA Japanese new year’s eve tradition is to eat a bowl of soba noodle soup. The long and thin shape of the soba is supposed to signify longevity, and it’s considered an auspicious food to welcome another new year. This hearty variation uses curry soup along with umami-packed ingredients like burdock root and chicken thigh. The curry soba noodles is a perfectly warming and comforting meal for a cold winter night, which our new year’s eve in New York City turned out to be this year, with temperatures in the single digit overnight.

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Curry Soba with Burdock and Chicken
DASH considerations: This curry soba noodle has a major strike against it when it comes to its place in a DASH meal plan. It’s pretty high in sodium, thanks to the Japanese curry roux. The particular brand I used has 580 mg of sodium in one serving of this noodle soup, which is 25% of the daily sodium limit right there, if you are following the 2,300 mg limit. And that’s before counting in the dashi soup mix and soba noodles themselves, each of which contribute more.

There are a few things you can do. First, don’t make this every day. When you have this curry soba, don’t finish all the soup (I know it’s tasty, but just don’t do it!). Just leaving half the soup will cut out half the sodium. Adding a side dish (something cool and crunchy like cucumbers or celery, with lemon juice or ginger to reduce the sodium need, might be a delicious way to go) and reducing the amount of the curry soba for each person can also be a workable trick. Whatever you do, don’t do what I did: Eat this after an appetizer of smoked salmon with crackers. I’m writing this off as a holiday slip...

I was under the impression that the fat content is also pretty high, but it turns out that fat was under control: Just 3.3 g of fat in one serving here, which is about 75% of a teaspoon of olive oil (1 DASH serving of fat/oil). Pfew.

DASH servings: 2 grains
2 meats& fish
1 vegetables& fruits
0.75 fat/oil
Prep Time 25 minutes
Servings
servubgs
Ingredients
Prep Time 25 minutes
Servings
servubgs
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Using the bowl you’ll serve the noodle soup in, measure out two bowls of water and pour it into a pot.
  2. Add the dashi soup mix and burdock to the pot and bring to a boil on high. Once boiling, reduce the heat to medium and let it boil gently for about 7-8 minutes, until the burdock is mostly cooked through.
  3. Meanwhile, put a big pot of water on high heat and bring it to a boil.
  4. Add the chicken to the pot of burdock and cook until the pieces are opaque and cooked through.
  5. Add the soba noodles to the big pot of boiling water and cook according to the package instruction. Mine took 4 minutes to al dente.
  6. Melt the curry roux cubes one at a time into the pot of chicken and burdock. The easiest way to make sure the roux melts completely is to take a bit of the soup base in a measuring cup, melt a cube of the roux right in the cup by stirring it with a fork or chopsticks, then release the curry liquid back into the soup. Repeat one by one.
  7. Divide the soba between two bowls. Top with the soup, chicken and burdock. Sprinkle with the chives.